A life’s work

I have written about oceans, waves, contaminated well water, droughts, rising water temperature, low lying land, loss of culture, loss of land, loss of identity. 

All of this I’ve written about and so I’m at a point in my writing career when my mind wanders to the big question: have I got anything left to give?

Te Toonati (Kiribati Donuts)

I’ve been writing long enough to know that the writing mojo comes in waves. Sometimes it’s there and sometimes it isn’t. It’s so frustrating when it isn’t, but it will pass. So, I’ve decided to pass the buck somewhat. Instead of forcing something that’s not there, I have asked my mum to write down her recipe for Kiribati donuts.

Teaote & The Wall

I have written a children’s book. It is a Kiribati story, with Kiribati characters and told with a Kiribati heart. It is called Teaote & The Wall.

5 Reasons Why You Need To Explore Your Culture

People say they love hearing about my culture and all I am doing is talking about Kiribati food, language, religion etc. It may not seem it but I have worked hard at making sure I am connected to my culture.

Say NO to the death penalty in Kiribati.

For thousands of years Pacific culture has lead to men believing that domestic violence is right and a man’s prerogative. This is absolutely wrong, but it doesn’t take a bill in parliament to change a society’s ways that they have held for thousands of years.

Looking forward, looking back.

By learning more about ourselves, we learn more about the world. The more we learn about the world, the more our diverse communities grow to learn and respect each other.It is everyone’s responsibility to share what they know about their own community.

Tong must work harder for Kiribati women

I walked back to the house with two cousins running ahead and a baby cousin on my hip. I was wearing a traditional Kiribati top (tiibuta) and a sarong. I was barefoot and despite my lighter skin, I could have been any other I-Kiribati woman. A baby on my hip, yelling at my younger cousins to stop fighting and going back to my house where my family waited.

Kairo

And then he grinned, took my backpack and swung it over his shoulder while I stood there stunned. He hopped on the motorbike gesturing me to hop on behind him.
‘What, you didn’t recognise me cousin?’
I stared at him for way too long.
‘Kairo! You’re so tall! And handsome!’