A life’s work

I have written about oceans, waves, contaminated well water, droughts, rising water temperature, low lying land, loss of culture, loss of land, loss of identity. 

All of this I’ve written about and so I’m at a point in my writing career when my mind wanders to the big question: have I got anything left to give?

How to find your culture.

And from there, word by work, sentence by sentence, essay by essay, my culture started to seep in. Bit by bit. It didn’t happen straight away.

Te Toonati (Kiribati Donuts)

I’ve been writing long enough to know that the writing mojo comes in waves. Sometimes it’s there and sometimes it isn’t. It’s so frustrating when it isn’t, but it will pass. So, I’ve decided to pass the buck somewhat. Instead of forcing something that’s not there, I have asked my mum to write down her recipe for Kiribati donuts.

Kiribati architecture and design

The canoe is made by the men in the village, but this couldn’t be done without relying on the strength and quality of the women’s rope. A thought which I find so wonderful 🙂

The Kiribati woman

In my own cultural journey, these points are just some of the reasons I allow myself the title of upholding what it means to be a proud I-Kiribati woman…

Teaote & The Wall

I have written a children’s book. It is a Kiribati story, with Kiribati characters and told with a Kiribati heart. It is called Teaote & The Wall.

5 Reasons Why You Need To Explore Your Culture

People say they love hearing about my culture and all I am doing is talking about Kiribati food, language, religion etc. It may not seem it but I have worked hard at making sure I am connected to my culture.

350 Pacific and the Climate Warriors

I feel more comfortable using the written word to express my thoughts than to stand in front of people that are going about their business with a sign accusing their corporation for ruining the world. But that all changed this week.